Recognition in education

Here’s an excerpt from a post a little while ago over at the Deckchairs on the obligation and failure of tertiary institutions to recognise their students: “There are students in every classroom I teach who know that politics is run by people who have more comfortable lives than they do. As far as they can… Continue reading Recognition in education

Doing Justice to the Past

New co-written article out in Philosophy & Social Criticism. Very pleased! Just in time for, and relevant to, Australia Day debates. Abstract In this article, we argue that the usual restriction of critical theory to ‘modern’ norms is subject to problems of coherence, historical accuracy and moral obligation. First, we illustrate how critical theory opposes… Continue reading Doing Justice to the Past

On Political Amnesia

Laura Tingle, “Political Amnesia: How we forgot how to govern”, Quarterly Essay 60 (Black Inc., 2015). Tingle’s essay is a lengthy investigation of the processes and mechanisms of current Australian government, especially of the way in which they enable or prevent the practical memory of political experience. She contrasts these with the history of these… Continue reading On Political Amnesia

What social philosophy can learn from medieval history

One of my current writing projects looks at the historicist methodological principles in contemporary critical theory. With a colleague, we’re arguing that restricting one’s gaze to so-called “modern” forms of freedom contradicts the theory of freedom (insofar as it bids us recognise our equals wherever and whenever they may be), and in particular, ignores the… Continue reading What social philosophy can learn from medieval history