On transparency

In some of my current research, I’m looking at the concept of transparency, via Stefanos Geroulanos’s recent history of postwar France. Today, when we think of this idea, we might think of political transparency, in the sense of the availability of information, to the public, about political processes. That sort of availability, an access to information, is about… Continue reading On transparency

Responses to Theses on Theory and History

There’s a growing body of discussion for the recent Theses on Theory and History. Here’s some of them. I’ll try to update this. I’ve got a blog post of my own in preparation, but in the meantime, happy reading! Matt Fitzpatrick at The Kaiser and the Colonies The #theoryrevolt Twitter feed is very diverse, and… Continue reading Responses to Theses on Theory and History

A place for theory in history

Unsurprisingly, the recent manifesto, “Theses on theory and history” has received some grumpy responses. Some ask for “evidence” of the analysis, others say “we’ve already done this” (but then concede several points); some honest answers have at least admitted that they don’t quite understand the stakes, or the kind of critical history that is being… Continue reading A place for theory in history

Where does philosophy of history fit?

Four ways to locate the philosophy of history Philosophy of history, as a sub-field, has little visible presence in mainstream philosophy. There are few courses on it. It’s not a faddish research area with job-postings aplenty. We just don’t know where it fits, and as a result we aren’t sure what it involves. But that… Continue reading Where does philosophy of history fit?

Not historicism: Derrida’s Heidegger Course, s.2

Continuing my summary of Derrida’s 1964-5 seminars on Sein und Zeit. Derrida keeps up a continuous narrative of where he is up to in his narrative. Pedagogically, it’s very useful – he recalls what they discussed the previous time (usually a fortnight before), and he repeats in concise fashion the conclusions that were reached. It doesn’t… Continue reading Not historicism: Derrida’s Heidegger Course, s.2

Derrida’s Heidegger Course, 1964-5, seminar 1

The inquiry into “the question of being” as a guiding thread is distinguished from understanding it as a) Hegelian “refutation” as ontological development in history, and b) any “ontology”, because it is not a matter of seeing the truth of an historical being but of showing why all efforts at ontology essentially miss clarifying the… Continue reading Derrida’s Heidegger Course, 1964-5, seminar 1

Forum: JHI Blog on Memory and History

The blog for the Journal of the History of Ideas is running a forum responding to Jeffrey Andrew Barash’s recent book, Collective Memory and Historical Understanding.  My own contribution will be appearing later today, with two already up. Michael Meng posted first, calling attention to the critical, democratic, role for history. Sophie Marcotte-Chénard then proposed –… Continue reading Forum: JHI Blog on Memory and History