No end of books

The new semester has started rolling in Australia. While the Northern hemisphere is busily gearing up for a new academic year, in the Antipodes we have had a brief break, perhaps punctuated by conferences, before rolling into the second semester. Unit guides have been published, first lectures charted out, and here we are: fresh batches… Continue reading No end of books

Philosophy, ‘pipelines’, and online teaching

Philosophy has no industry. Outside of the university, and a small number of independent authors, there is no job titled ‘philosopher’. It’s an observation students make a lot to me, and is probably one encountered the world over (with – maybe – an exception in France; I’d love to know…). And yet philosophy is also… Continue reading Philosophy, ‘pipelines’, and online teaching

Subjective and objective elements in justice for education

[Abstract for an upcoming workshop] Recent political discussion in Australia regularly raises concern over State support for education, from early childhood through to University and institutions for vocational training. The main reference is Australia’s relative decline in benchmarks compared to other OECD countries. Debate often focuses on the “Gonski” report, the funding and implementation of… Continue reading Subjective and objective elements in justice for education

Why you should attend lectures

For my students. A lot of philosophy is about arguments. Not in the antagonistic and angry way, but in reasoned debate. Philosophy is more than opinions, for it is about persuading others that a particular view is the right or most reasonable view. That can be hard for young adults, trying to carve out a space for… Continue reading Why you should attend lectures

The secret of genius

Let’s learn, then, near those poets who have been adorned with the title genius. It is they who will betray to us the secret of that imposing word. The secret of genius is that of universal teaching: learning, repeating, imitating, translating, taking apart, putting back together. Ranciere, The Ignorant Schoolmaster, p.68. Which is to say, genius amounts… Continue reading The secret of genius

Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster

Notes on ch.1: An Intellectual Adventure For interest and brevity, let’s summarise the sections of the chapter in a sentence each. I’m not explicating here (a term to be defined below); I’m giving myself a “command” to learn. Intro (1-4): Joseph Jacotot (1870-1840) wound up teaching French in Flemish-speaking Belgium, but he didn’t know Flemish, and… Continue reading Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster

Summer Reading Group: The Ignorant Schoolmaster

I’m running a reading group with a colleague at Macquarie, reading Jacques Rancière’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster. For me, I’m interested in pursuing the way that the structure of education provides a diagnosis of the state of society – Rancière’s interest being, of course, in the presupposition of equality (or inequality) in the learning & teaching relationship.… Continue reading Summer Reading Group: The Ignorant Schoolmaster