Two historicities: Painting & Speech

Painting and language provide two modes of a living historicity, which lead us to understanding the interweaving of all experience.[1] What is distinct in them as modes? What finally justifies their comparison and ultimate unity? How are the historical bands specific to each kind of expression? What differentiates painting as visible and speech as audible… Continue reading Two historicities: Painting & Speech

The secret of genius

Let’s learn, then, near those poets who have been adorned with the title genius. It is they who will betray to us the secret of that imposing word. The secret of genius is that of universal teaching: learning, repeating, imitating, translating, taking apart, putting back together. Ranciere, The Ignorant Schoolmaster, p.68. Which is to say, genius amounts… Continue reading The secret of genius

Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster

Notes on ch.1: An Intellectual Adventure For interest and brevity, let’s summarise the sections of the chapter in a sentence each. I’m not explicating here (a term to be defined below); I’m giving myself a “command” to learn. Intro (1-4): Joseph Jacotot (1870-1840) wound up teaching French in Flemish-speaking Belgium, but he didn’t know Flemish, and… Continue reading Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster

On expression

Expression can then be first roughly described of as a kind of making public or visible through a bodily action. This captures something of gestural expressions and labour, as well as linguistic utterances. In expression, there is literally a pressing-outwards of something that was not yet visible that was contained in the inner life of… Continue reading On expression

Serres on Leibniz and the line

Chris Watkin translates an interesting passage from Serres’s thesis on Leibniz (1968), here. Two things I notice. First, the teleological structure of the historical interest. Serres’ thesis is of interest because of what he will become. Second, the comments on the line – these are very close to comments by Derrida (published a year before), a… Continue reading Serres on Leibniz and the line