The Age of Grammatology

I’ve just read, via Peter, of a short conference on Of Grammatology to be held June next year. I really should try to be there! There is a lot I could say about the ‘age of Grammatology’ as Derrida’s diagnosis of a deep shift in historical articulation. Grasping one’s time in thought, after all.

But note that they pitch the ‘age of Grammatology’ in empirical and quotidian terms as one of movements in philosophy. Historicism strikes again.

Here is the call for papers:

1967 was perhaps the annus mirabilis for the oeuvre of Jacques Derrida: Writing and Difference, Speech and Phenomenon and Of Grammatology all appeared in French in that year. More generally, 1967 figures as a decisive moment in the history of what came to be called ‘theory’, ‘continental philosophy’, ‘post-structuralism’ and ‘deconstruction’. The Oxford Literary Review is holding a one-day symposium on Friday 23 June 2017 at the University of Sussex, in order to celebrate, commiserate and otherwise reflect on the 50 years since the French publication of Of Grammatology. We invite papers (20 minutes in length) from scholars working in any subject or area of research touched by or touching on ‘the Age of Grammatology’. We envisage a day of talks, concluding with a roundtable discussion with Geoffrey Bennington (Emory), Peggy Kamuf (USC), Michael Naas (DePaul), Nicholas Royle (Sussex) and Sarah Wood (Kent).

Send proposals to: Nicholas Royle at n.w.o.royle@sussex.ac.uk by 1 December 2016.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s