Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster

Notes on ch.1: An Intellectual Adventure For interest and brevity, let’s summarise the sections of the chapter in a sentence each. I’m not explicating here (a term to be defined below); I’m giving myself a “command” to learn. Intro (1-4): Joseph Jacotot (1870-1840) wound up teaching French in Flemish-speaking Belgium, but he didn’t know Flemish, and… Continue reading Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster

Semester 1 Teaching: Freedom and Domination (PHL254)

Here is the blurb on my teaching for Semester 1 at Macquarie (Unit Guide). I’m teaching 19th C. German philosophy: The term ‘freedom’ is frequently used today, but what does the concept of freedom really mean? Is there more freedom in modern liberal societies than in other forms of society? If so, does this make… Continue reading Semester 1 Teaching: Freedom and Domination (PHL254)

Summer Reading Group: The Ignorant Schoolmaster

I’m running a reading group with a colleague at Macquarie, reading Jacques Rancière’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster. For me, I’m interested in pursuing the way that the structure of education provides a diagnosis of the state of society – Rancière’s interest being, of course, in the presupposition of equality (or inequality) in the learning & teaching relationship.… Continue reading Summer Reading Group: The Ignorant Schoolmaster

What social philosophy can learn from medieval history

One of my current writing projects looks at the historicist methodological principles in contemporary critical theory. With a colleague, we’re arguing that restricting one’s gaze to so-called “modern” forms of freedom contradicts the theory of freedom (insofar as it bids us recognise our equals wherever and whenever they may be), and in particular, ignores the… Continue reading What social philosophy can learn from medieval history

Allen Wood on the (US) Philosophy job market

American philosopher Allen Wood – a well known Kant and Idealism scholar – blogs here on the applying for jobs in the US Philosophy market. The posts are on the official blog of the American Philosophical Association, which has, he mentions, also set up a sub-committee to review and advise on best practices for interviewing.… Continue reading Allen Wood on the (US) Philosophy job market