Why you should attend lectures

For my students. A lot of philosophy is about arguments. Not in the antagonistic and angry way, but in reasoned debate. Philosophy is more than opinions, for it is about persuading others that a particular view is the right or most reasonable view. That can be hard for young adults, trying to carve out a space for… Continue reading Why you should attend lectures

Diary of an ECR #12

This journal has been a little too inactive of late. Mostly, this is because I had a) a course to teach, and b) a journal article to complete. Pleased with my concentration on those things, I let the window to the internet-world slide. “Why add another task?” I said to myself? Twitter became the extent… Continue reading Diary of an ECR #12

Philosophy and history

At Macquarie we have developed a little focus area on the interaction between philosophy and history; the history of philosophy; the methodological concerns relevant to philosophy, and so on. A few of us – myself, Mike Olson, Jean-Philippe Deranty, among others – have been pursuing these ideas here and there. So, we’re going to conduct… Continue reading Philosophy and history

Diary of an ECR #11: Teaching and research

A full month since my last post. Teaching is underway, and I’m at work on a research article. Throw in a few other parts of life, and things have got suddenly a whole lot busier. And that means less space to reflect on what it is I am doing. But let’s make some time for that now. With… Continue reading Diary of an ECR #11: Teaching and research

The secret of genius

Let’s learn, then, near those poets who have been adorned with the title genius. It is they who will betray to us the secret of that imposing word. The secret of genius is that of universal teaching: learning, repeating, imitating, translating, taking apart, putting back together. Ranciere, The Ignorant Schoolmaster, p.68. Which is to say, genius amounts… Continue reading The secret of genius

Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster

Notes on ch.1: An Intellectual Adventure For interest and brevity, let’s summarise the sections of the chapter in a sentence each. I’m not explicating here (a term to be defined below); I’m giving myself a “command” to learn. Intro (1-4): Joseph Jacotot (1870-1840) wound up teaching French in Flemish-speaking Belgium, but he didn’t know Flemish, and… Continue reading Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster