Where does philosophy of history fit?

Four ways to locate the philosophy of history Philosophy of history, as a sub-field, has little visible presence in mainstream philosophy. There are few courses on it. It’s not a faddish research area with job-postings aplenty. We just don’t know where it fits, and as a result we aren’t sure what it involves. But that… Continue reading Where does philosophy of history fit?

No end of books

The new semester has started rolling in Australia. While the Northern hemisphere is busily gearing up for a new academic year, in the Antipodes we have had a brief break, perhaps punctuated by conferences, before rolling into the second semester. Unit guides have been published, first lectures charted out, and here we are: fresh batches… Continue reading No end of books

Taking account of contracts

In my previous post I added up a few figures on my financial year as a contract academic. I suggested, too, that what was important here was recognition. In saying that, I wanted to move the debate away from my personal circumstances – mine are just one example, after all – and open up the… Continue reading Taking account of contracts

Not historicism: Derrida’s Heidegger Course, s.2

Continuing my summary of Derrida’s 1964-5 seminars on Sein und Zeit. Derrida keeps up a continuous narrative of where he is up to in his narrative. Pedagogically, it’s very useful – he recalls what they discussed the previous time (usually a fortnight before), and he repeats in concise fashion the conclusions that were reached. It doesn’t… Continue reading Not historicism: Derrida’s Heidegger Course, s.2

Derrida’s Heidegger Course, 1964-5, seminar 1

The inquiry into “the question of being” as a guiding thread is distinguished from understanding it as a) Hegelian “refutation” as ontological development in history, and b) any “ontology”, because it is not a matter of seeing the truth of an historical being but of showing why all efforts at ontology essentially miss clarifying the… Continue reading Derrida’s Heidegger Course, 1964-5, seminar 1